III. Resources

C. Curriculum


1. The curriculum must ensure the achievement of program goals and learning domains. Instruction must be an appropriate sequence of classroom, laboratory, clinical, and field/internship activities. Instruction must be based on clearly written course syllabi describing learning goals, course objectives, and competencies required for graduation.

The program must demonstrate by comparison that the curriculum offered meets or exceeds the content and competency demands of the latest edition of the United States Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National Emergency Medical Services Core Content, Scope of Practice Model, and Education Standards, and the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions Curriculum Supplement.
  • Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic

Accredited programs typically range from 1000-1300 clock hours, including the four integrated phases of education (didactic, laboratory, and clinical and field) to cover the stated curriculum. Further prerequisites and/or co-requisites may be required to address competencies in basic health sciences (Anatomy and Physiology) and in basic academic skills (English and Mathematics) and together with the core content of the Emergency Medical Technician-Basic and Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic curricula may lead to an academic degree.

  • Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate

The current national curriculum recommends 300-400 clock hours, including the four integrated phases of education (didactic, laboratory, and clinical and field) to cover the stated curriculum. Further pre-requisites and /or co-requisites may be required to address competencies in basic health sciences (Anatomy and Physiology) and in basic academic skills (English and Mathematics) and together with the core content of the Emergency Medical Technician-Basic and the Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate curricula may lead to an academic certificate or degree.

For those programs offering an exit point at the Emergency Medical Technician-Basic level, the current national curriculum for Emergency Medical Technician-Basic recommends 110 clock hours of integrated didactic and laboratory instruction. Clinical/field rotations should be of sufficient length to allow students to interview and assess a minimum of five patients. For those programs offering an exit point at the First Responder level, the current national curriculum for First Responder recommends 40 clock hours of integrated didactic and laboratory instruction. For further details on these curricula, see the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions website at www.CoAEMSP.org.

2. The program must track the number of times each student successfully performs each of the competencies required for the appropriate exit point according to patient age, pathologies, complaint, gender, and interventions.

3. The field internship must provide the student with an opportunity to serve as team leader in a variety of prehospital advanced life support emergency medical situations.

Enough of the field internship should occur following the completion of the didactic and clinical phases of the program to assure that the student has achieved the desired didactic and clinical competencies of the curriculum prior to the commencement of the field internship. Some didactic material may be taught concurrent with the field internship.

CAAHEP Standards and Guidelines for the Accreditation of Educational Programs in the Emergency Medical Services Profession p.7-8, accessed 7/14/2010